The IRP Program was designed to help infrastructure practitioners strengthen the knowledge and competencies they require to advance more climate-resilient approaches for the planning, design and management of infrastructure.

Infrastructure Resilience Professional (IRP) Credentialling Program

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The IRP Program has been designed to help infrastructure practitioners strengthen the knowledge and competencies they require to advance more climate-resilient approaches for the planning, design and management of infrastructure. Engineers Canada – the umbrella organization for the 12 regional Canadian regulators of the engineering profession – launched the Program in 2016 as a series of courses for engineers on the  PIEVC Protocol, asset management, risk management, and climate change law.

 

These online courses will be of interest to engineers and other professionals who are involved in the planning, procurement, design, operation, maintenance, management and regulation of infrastructure and who need to consider the changing climate in carrying out these activities.

 

CRI assumed responsibility for the Program and began offering the courses in 2020.

 

To obtain the IRP credential, engineers must successfully complete six courses, demonstrate experience related to climate change and infrastructure and be a licenced Professional Engineer. The following is a list of IRP courses and their respective upcoming availability. Click on the course title to view a detailed description. Registration links take you directly to the Royal Roads University site, where CRI courses are hosted and you can complete your registration.

 

Would you like to be notified when new course dates are announced? Sign up to the IRP COURSE NOTIFICATION EMAIL LIST.

 

 

IRP Courses

Rules for Obtaining and Maintaining the IRP Credential

 

Obtaining your IRP credential requires: 

  • You are already a licensed professional engineer (P.Eng); 
  • You successfully complete the six IRP courses within a three-year time period. 
  • You can demonstrate you have led or substantively contributed 320 total hours as a P.Eng on climate change and infrastructure projects, on at least two (2) distinct projects.
  • Note: IRP courses taken by an engineer while still an EIT may be counted toward the IRP credential. However, the credential itself will be granted only once the EIT has become a P.Eng and has met, as a P.Eng, the projects requirement stipulated above. 

 

Maintaining your IRP credential requires:  

  • You remain up-to-date with your IRP membership ($75 renewal each year); 
  • You provide, every second year upon membership renewal, proof of continuing professional development related to climate change and infrastructure resiliency. 

 

The IRP credential is outside of, and in addition to, professional engineering licensure.  

 

Benefits of the IRP

 

 

The IRP enhances confidence that the infrastructure engineer has the knowledge to: 

 

  • use requisite tools to assess future climate impacts;  
  • apply a systems approach to threats on infrastructure services, to maintain their safe operations; and, 
  • reduce risk to the public resulting from a changing climate. 

 

The IRP may help the infrastructure engineer

 

  •  acquire and maintain additional competencies to increase their marketability and make them better multi-discipline team leaders; and, 
  • reduce their professional and legal exposure.